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Useful Idiot, Willing Asset, Or Traitor

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      https://www.rawstory.com/2019/05/mueller-gave-trum...

      Ed Buckner popped this story on Yabberz. I have a slightly different take, and I share to my thousands of FB friends and followers.

      At any rate, the more people who read this story, the better.

      .....

      Useful Idiot, Willing Accomplice, Or Traitor?

      (Bravo to the author of my seed article! Excellent work.)


      When it is proved, and it will be, that Trump enlisted the aid of Russian spies to corrupt the electoral process and steal the Presidential election, much to the advantage of his organized crime partners; then we will know that Trump is an idiot, accomplice and traitor. We already know that he is an idiot and accomplice from his public statements.

      We know now that 45* hates the United States. We know that the people who support him want to destroy our country, end democracy worldwide, and kill us. If you don't know that they want to kill us all, then re-read the words of the head of the N.R.A. who said that it "might be necessary" to kill everyone who disagrees with their extremist, racist murderous beliefs. The rest is proved pretty nicely in my seed article.

      Trump is a useful idiot by profession. He has devoted his life to conspicuous idiocy. He thinks that by playing the fool he proves that everyone is as stupid as he is. But, he can't even read and write. He thinks that being a successful criminal shows that everyone should be as crooked, and proud of it, as he is. But, he is hunted; and he will be run to ground and killed, eventually, like an animal. Because he is a traitor! Everyone saw Trump invite Russian hackers and spies to interfere in elections, everyone knows that they did. Everyone knows that criminals in the Republican Caucus are covering up that very interference. So Trump, and his supporters are willing accomplices. They know it's illegal and they know it's treason; but they do it anyway because they believe that they can get away with it: that's the definition of criminality. They are criminals. We should put them in prison.

      Has Trump taken the final step and committed treasonous acts? Of course he has, right up front, when he invited Russian hackers and trolls to interfere.

      Was that the plan all along, and, oh so mafia-like: Commit treason in plain sight, and dare anyone to do anything about it. When they don't, everything after that pales in comparison, and you can do anything; such as replace "law" with mafia-style arbitration, threaten and harm anyone who opposes you and your campaign, and you are unimpeded in installing totalitarianism as our form of government, with Trump as absolute autocrat (where his word IS law).

      Idiot, Conspirator AND Traitor! Now, that is a definition that I will accept for my President of the United States.


      Sure makes you wonder who: "unindicted co- conspirator" is. And why? What sin is so great that one would commit treason to hide it? What dream of Avarice is so alluring that one would commit fratricide to make concrete, what hate so all-consuming as to justify? And why did our law enforcement fail us? That's the question that overshadows all others. Why did law enforcement betray the People of the United States?

      Our government, as things stand, is probably a fraud and a counterfeit. If anyone should know the answer to that question, it is the federal police. But, they don't include us in the loop. No one has our backs. Damn! I almost forgot that "collusion" thing. Trump colludes every time he has secret meetings with criminal dictators. They may be making secret plans to make sure that everyone has a happy birthday this year, or are in direct extremely personal contact planning to overthrow the United States government and end democracy worldwide. I don't know. There are people who do. I know one thing though: if it's the latter, and Trump received any sort of instructions from Putin without informing Congress, or aid from them in fixing any election, anywhere, then the crime is treason and impeachable, and the punishments may include death.

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      Donald Trump Calls For The Execution Of Four Americans

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          “Sir," NBC’s Peter Alexander said, "the Constitution says treason is punishable by death.”

          Trump gave a slight nod of acknowledgment.

          “You’ve accused your adversaries of treason,” Alexander continued. “Who specifically are you accusing of treason?”

          Trump named

          James Comey

          Andrew McCabe

          Peter Strzok

          Lisa Page

          Chilling, when you have a President who will name his political opponents as guilty of treason, knowing that treason is punishable by death.

          He just quite literally called for his political opponents to be executed, just because they oppose him.

          I TOLD you all...before the election in 2016...that Trump did not want to be President...he wanted to be KING OF AMERICA.

          I hate being right.

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/05/23...

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          Yes, Congress Can Walk And Chew Gum....

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              This Congress has passed over 100 bills since they took their seats in January, many of them are bipartisan. They are timely and necessary. Congress is quite capable of chewing gum, walking and and a few other things on the side. The Senate is another case indeed. The Senate Majority Leader, has proclaimed himself, "The Grim Reaper," because he is where the bills go to die. If you are one of those people who believe that Congress is too obsessed with Trump to do their jobs, you are woefully uninformed or maybe you would rather repeat talking points, regardless of reality.

              I think most of the Congress would love nothing more than impeaching Donald J Trump. They eventually will, I have no doubt. As things are, it would be hard to believe that the Senate would indict. In return, we also know that that it will only inflame him, make him more off the hook, desperate and dangerous than he already is, but it is not not likely to remove him. Tolerating this behavior from the Executive Branch, sets a terrible precedent for the behavior of future Presidents.

              We have a complicit Senate Majority, who fear being primaried, more than they fear the fascist wannabe dictator in the Oval Office. A good number of them are members in good standing of the John Birch Society, the few that aren't; have learned that it's better to look the other way. Yes, there are some Democrats, and no, they are not shy. Their outrage is lost to the Majority.

              The Majority of our Senate does not care about anything that Trump does, any more than they care about what he has already done. Yesterday, our President handed Presidential powers over to our AG, who has already lied to Congress, lied to us and arguably obstructed justice. The wall that keeps our DOJ and Executive Branch as separate, but equal entities, has been breached, publicly. The implications are huge and dangerous to all Americans. They are especially dangerous to our press, our lawmakers and anyone who opposes the President.

              Trump has effectively created a Police State, with mountains of propaganda in the way of information, hand picked with Presidential powers, by a man who has lied to Congress, misrepresented a 22 month report because he does not believe that anyone should question our president or concern ourselves with what he does or whom he does it with.

              We live in "interesting," times.

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                  Fascism (/ˈfæʃɪzəm/) is a form of radical, right-wing, authoritarian ultranationalism, characterized by dictatorial power, forcible suppression of opposition, and strong regimentation of society and of the economy

                  The following is a recap of how Trump and company are attempting to take over our country. If ever we could see his attempt to rule/dictate, this past week he’s pushed it into our faces so that we cannot ignore it.

                  I am leaving just a few paragraphs and a link to be read by those of us who resist and openly advocate and fight against Trump’s group of ugly, arrogant and no longer camouflaged authoritarianism.

                  Too many outrages have taken place to make it feasible to copy and paste this entire article, but since the fascism is increasing, I hope Yabberz readers will click on the link and read the report. Our very democracy is under fire!

                  .

                  Intro:

                  Welcome to another edition of What Fresh Hell?, Raw Story’s roundup of news items that might have become controversies under another regime, but got buried – or were at least under-appreciated – due to the daily firehose of political pratfalls, unhinged tweet storms and other sundry embarrassments coming out of the current White House.

                  This was a banner week of outrages from the reliably outrageous Trump gang but we shouldn’t let that obscure the overarching storyline. We’re no longer dealing with creeping authoritarianism; Trump went all-in this week. A president* who has run roughshod over democratic norms, politicized law enforcement and shown nothing but contempt for the co-equal branches of government made two moves that turned it up to 11.


                  Read the report:

                  https://www.rawstory.com/2019/05/democracy-under-fire-the-trump-regime-lurched-harder-toward-authoritarianism-this-week/?utm_source=push_notifications

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                  Why Doesn't Mitch McConnell Care About Election Interference?

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                      https://www.salon.com/2019/05/24/is-this-the-reaso...

                      Why Doesn't Mitch McConnell care about election interference?

                      McConnell's Move To Corrupt Vital Defense Industries:

                      During WW2,and for years after, American kids were part of a desperate effort to salvage aluminum: they gathered little bits of litter from sidewalks - chewing gum wrappers - and painstakingly separated the thin layers of paper and aluminum. We had to have aluminum to defend ourselves: without it we can't fly, or make war. You carried a little ball of aluminum in your pocket.

                      Aluminum is our most vital metal. There's no denying the usefulness of vanadium, and the seriousness of that crisis. Nor the value of titanium. But, no aluminum is as good as the Stone Age.

                      Mitch McConnell has enabled a Russian oligarch, an aluminum tycoon, to make a major by-in into the American aluminum industry. The same Russian oligarch named in the Mueller Investigation; and the same oligarch who was under financial sanctions by the United States government for financial crimes, and suspected of interfering in our elections - not even a year ago.

                      Mitch wants this nightmare to sit on the board of a major aluminum producer right here in America, in Kentucky. Smack dab in the middle of an industry vital to military and high-tech industry. How is it possible that the leaders of this country have become so stupid? Mitch McConnell needs to be seen as a threat to national security. He's an out of control psychotic into self-harm. And, he's unconscionably changing the Constitution every day.

                      Let me ask the almost primal question: do you trust a man who sleeps with the devil? If McConnell works with blackmailers and extortionists, then how do we know that he is not being blackmailed? If he works with election hackers, then how do we know where and when he condones hacking? If McConnell supports Russian billionaires exercising control in vital defense industries, then where does that stop?

                      What gets me is how anyone who calls themselves a Republican can support allowing a Russian oligarch to sit on the Board of a corporation that is part of a vital defense industry. Now that's psychotic! I doubt that they can even recognize themselves in the mirror in the morning.


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                      Exactly!!

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                          A Second Constitutional Convention?

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                              The last constitutional convention was in 1787. Although the Constitution is a very visionary document, it is impossible for anyone to predict and guard against all possible threats to our democracy. The Trump era has exposed many unprotected matters related to the powers of the executive branch, as well as how a president is elected.

                              Although we often hear people say there are three co-equal branches of the federal government, the framers of the Constitution intended for the legislative branch to be the dominant branch, as its representatives are elected directly by the people, even though "the people" in 1787 did not include poor white males, white women and people of color.

                              After 240 years and Donald Trump, is it time for a constitutional convention to clarify that the United States of America is a nation of laws and not of men, that those laws are equally applied to all people and that no one, including the president, is above those laws?


                              http://harvardpolitics.com/united-states/an-imperfect-union-the-case-for-a-second-constitutional-convention/

                              We the Living


                              Perhaps the first person to propose a Second Constitutional Convention, albeit implicitly, was Thomas Jefferson, who was overseas in France during the first convention. In a 1789 letter to James Madison, Jefferson wrestled with the question of whether one generation can legislate for future generations. After conducting some calculations, he concluded that no law can be binding after 19 years. “No society can make a perpetual constitution, or even a perpetual law,” Jefferson wrote. “The earth belongs to the living and not to the dead.” It is quite remarkable that at its core the structure of American government has not changed in the two centuries since Jefferson declared that “the earth belongs to the living.” The United States is still a democratic republic with three branches of government, a bicameral legislature, and a presidential veto, but we are starting to see the walls of this old house begin to crack.


                              To change the basic framework of the constitution would be immensely difficult. Amendments require the approval of two-thirds of each house of Congress and three-fourths of the states. In other words, change by majority rule is hard. As Jefferson predicted, “The people cannot assemble themselves; their representation is unequal and vicious.” Without a Second Constitutional Convention, we are stuck with this form of government for the foreseeable future. The question is, is this form a good one?


                              An Imperfect Union


                              For many who have studied the Constitution and American government at length, the answer to that question is no. “I started out as what I would call a friendly or academic critic of the Constitution,” University of Texas Law School professor Sanford V. Levinson told the HPR. “But sometime in the last five or 10 years, I’ve shifted from being a relative moderate critic to really believing that the Constitution is taking us over a cliff, that it is a clear and present danger to the American public, and that it is really a disgrace that we are not having a national conversation about what a constitutional convention might actually do.” Levinson is one of the most prominent legal scholars to call for a Second Constitutional Convention, having first endorsed the idea in his 2006 book Our Undemocratic Constitution. Since then, the proposition of a convention has been backed by an awkward cluster of thinkers across the ideological spectrum, including Harvard Law professor Lawrence Lessig on the left and the billionaire Koch brothers on the right.


                              To criticize the U.S. Constitution is usually considered an offense to patriotism. The Founding Fathers have been revered into immortality, and the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are among the most venerated texts of that era. When Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told an Egyptian reporter, “I would not look to the U.S. Constitution, if I were drafting a Constitution in the year 2012,” she was unsurprisingly attacked for her comments. And yet Ginsburg’s point deserves merit. In the two centuries since the Constitution was written, there have undoubtedly been advancements in constitutional design, just as there have been in science, technology, medicine, and every other field. Empirical evidence vindicates Ginsburg’s comment—a 2012 study found that other countries have become increasingly unlikely to model their constitutions after America’s.


                              Intolerance of constitutional criticism often reflects a lack of understanding of what exactly the Constitution’s critics believe is wrong with the document. When thinkers like Levinson and Ginsburg find fault with the Constitution, it is not for the reasons that most Americans might expect. It is certainly alarming that the rights guaranteed by the Constitution originally excluded poor whites, women, and people of color, but these defects do not explain America’s structural breakdown today. The post-Civil War Reconstruction Amendments and the Supreme Court have expanded the rights of those whom the framers originally excluded. Instead, the greatest flaws of the Constitution lie in the form of government it created. “What is taking us over a cliff right now is not the Bill of Rights or the 14th Amendment,” Levinson said. “It’s structural provisions.” In Levinson’s view, “we could have perfect rights provisions, and we could still have a dangerously dysfunctional Congress, and we could still have a sociopath in the White House.”


                              Although we often think of the Constitution as embodying timeless principles, it is very much a document steeped in its time. As Levinson writes in his book Framed, the two great compromises of the Constitutional Convention were the product of arguments about political representation and slavery, and the stakes of these debates were enormous—if one side wasn’t happy, they could walk, and the tenuous Union would dissolve. Thus, the convention created a government that answered the peculiar challenges of the post-revolutionary era, but one not based on the best theories of constitutional design. Then, to add insult the injury, the framers created a highly demanding amendment process, making the Constitution particularly difficult to change.


                              A perfect illustration of this constitutional defect is the archaic Electoral College. According to Levinson, the electoral system was predicated on the understanding that slave states would receive a numeric boost as a result of the Three-Fifths Compromise, and was created on the assumption that American politics would have no political parties. Since 1787, slavery has been abolished and politics have come to be dominated by a two-party system, and yet the Electoral College is still the law of the land. The consequence has been the designation of just a few states as “swing states,” which dominate the campaign season and decide the election. Voters in other states are left as cogs in a machine, which may partially explain why the United States has voter turnout rates below 60 percent, lower than nearly all other developed countries. And yet this anachronistic system has concrete and enormous consequences: two of the last five presidential elections have handed the presidency to a candidate who lost the popular vote, with Trump having lost the popular vote by 3 million votes.

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