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      There is much to celebrate. The first march galvanized many women across the country to become politically active for the first time in their lives. Many poured their energy into helping to elect an unprecedented number of women to Congress last year.

      People gathered at Freedom Plaza in Washington today for the Women’s March.CreditCreditJoshua Roberts/Reuters


      In many cities across the United States, people have gathered together today to celebrate the second anniversary of the Women’s March that took place not only in the U.S. but also in cities in other countries. It is a smaller march than the one two years ago, to be sure, and yes, it has been plagued by dissension and controversy. It is a protest march; but it is also a celebration of how women’s activism has helped to elect a Democratic House and also helped to elect an increased number of knowledgable, enthusiastic, qualified women into Congress.

      In the closest city to where I live, the day is overcast, and shows a potential for rain, yet thousands of demonstrators have gathered at our California Capitol with the aim of empowering women and men by providing support for grassroots activists to engage in local communities.

      The women’s led march is a mass political movement that tells of the power of women to create change. The mission statement reads:
      “Women’s March is committed to dismantling systems of oppression through nonviolent resistance and building inclusive structures guided by self-determination, dignity and respect.” . . . . words from which the current Trump/GOP led government has appeared to be allergic.

      .

      Many of the women who attended the Women’s Unity Rally at Foley Square in New York on Saturday came to support immigrants. CreditAngela Weiss/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

      .
      Excerpts From the New York Times

      Two years after millions marched around the country and the world in an unambiguous rebuke to President Trump, much smaller crowds appeared at Saturday’s events surrounding the second anniversary of the Women’s March.

      There was much to celebrate. The first march galvanized many women across the country to become politically active for the first time in their lives. Many poured their energy into helping to elect an unprecedented number of women to Congress last year.

      But Saturday was also a test of how the Women’s March movement has weathered a storm of controversy in recent months.

      Tamika Mallory, co-president of Women’s March, the group that has planned the march in Washington, has been under fire for ties to Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam, who is widely reviled for anti-Semitic speeches. The Women’s March has issued a series of statements denouncing anti-Semitism and apologized for its delayed response to the controversy.

      .

      Tamika Mallory, CreditMaddie McGarvey for The New York Times
      .
      “I’m disappointed. It’s definitely not the turnout I was looking for” said Peggy Baron, 53, a lawyer from Dublin, Ohio, who said that the first Washington march two years ago had been “wall-to-wall women.”
      But as the morning progressed, throngs of marchers began to fill the plaza, and spirits visibly lifted.

      “I came two years ago. It’s definitely smaller, but the spirit is very much alive,” said Rachel Stucky, 53, an educator from Salem, Ore. “It’s a chance to march, to be with others who are like-minded, to be able to express my energy. People have a lot of say, and that doesn’t change
      Jo Reger, professor of sociology at Oakland University in Michigan, who studies feminist movements, said other factors that can depress turnout include activist burnout, and paradoxically, success.

      “Marches or movements can lose some momentum when people see some of their issues being addressed,” she said. “With the recent midterm elections, some may feel like the country is going in a different direction after the Trump election and that may lower the numbers participating.”

      But Ms. Compton, who traveled to Washington from her tiny town in northeastern Georgia, said the sense of excitement was only growing. She said the group of Democrats in Rabun County, where she lives, was nearly defunct in 2016, but has 300 members today.

      “We’re hopping busy all the time,” she said. “We came within a hair on a rat’s tail of electing a black woman as governor in Georgia.”

      “If we get busy in a bunch of petty fights, we get nowhere,” she said. “Not working together got us exactly where we are now and look what is in the White House.”

      https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/19/us/womens-march...
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          opie
          3 months ago

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          I was heartened to see the many marches across the nation that made clear their rejection of the national Leaders and held separate demonstrations.


          I was also heartened to see some brave female activists protesting the leadership at the Washington march.


          I was saddened to see so many that were willing to accept racism in their leadership under the banner of "unity", so long as that racism was limited to being against Jewish women and men.


          Saddened but not surprised. It's an age-old pattern.

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              opie
              3 months ago

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              The more open displays of women reflecting every way in which we are diverse and free and open and rights pursuing the better. Right, left, liberal, conservative, independent, no political affiliation at all - we ARE women. All races, ethnicities, religious affiliations. And we aren't about to be silent. Or defined.

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                  jondo
                  3 months ago

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                  Buncha Catholic school students who get "volunteered" by their handlers to show up and do what their Church has done for centuries: use force to control the lives of those who do not share their faith.

                  Some religious folks believe they are called to share God's word, and that its very power will convince them who have ears to hear-- convince them that they should obey that word.

                  Others have a different idea--like you, jondo, and like the ones in this crowd who wish to force women to give birth against their will. You think God's word is so weak that it needs a little help. So you use physical force, the power of law, intimidation-- whatever's handy--to force others to obey what you think is God's word, whether they truly believe it or not.

                  Doesn't say much for your faith, IMHO.

                  https://abcnews.go.com/US/viral-video-catholic-sch...


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