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Death May Not Be So Final, Thanks To These Creepy Technologies

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      Corey S. Powell:

      Every day, it seems, our lives become a bit less tangible. We’ve grown accustomed to photos, music and movies as things that exist only in digital form. But death? Strange as it sounds, the human corpse could be the next physical object to vanish from our lives.

      Within a couple of decades, visiting deceased friends and relatives by traveling to a grassy gravesite may seem as quaint as popping a videotape into your VHS player. By then, our whole experience of death may be drastically different.

      If you believe Ray Kurzweil, an outspoken futurist and the director of engineering at Google, computers will soon match the capabilities of the human brain. At that point, our consciousness will become intimately mingled with machine intelligence, leading to a kind of immorality.

      “We’re going to become increasingly non-biological, to the point where the biological part isn’t that important anymore,” Kurzweil declared in 2013 at a conference predicting the world of 2045. “Even if the biological part went away, it wouldn’t make any difference.”


      All I can say to this is a resounding. Bwahahaahahaa! ;)

      https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/death-may-not...

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      Throwback Tech: WebTV. The Vanguished User Friendly Dial-Up For The People

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          I wonder how many of today's readers remember the above dial-up screen? If you do that would mean that you, like me, and a few million others, were Little Black Boxers, webbers, webtv'ers! It was our little corner of the world. Oh, that marvelous set top box.

          Dial-Up Analogue. Internet TV subscription service. WebTV. The peoples connection. Surf the web using your own television. No computer needed. Just a television tuned to channel 3 or 4 and your phone service.

          Back down memory lane.

          At it's peak WebTV --Which later became MSN TV-- had a few million customers. I think they had around two or three million subscribers when I joined. If you have that many paying customers, dropping 24 bucks a month per address then you are making money. Somewhere in the neighborhood of $50 - 70 million a month gross. But like all things analogue, it's days were numbered from it's very inception. Digital Satellite Transmission and Fiber-Optic Cabling had arrived, it was only a matter of time before all internet players went digital, along with TV's and Phones and computer data. But while it lasted, it was a connection that those of us who used it cherished.

          Things you probably didn't know about WebTV / MSN TV.

          Name one thing WebTV had before everybody else. The precursor to what we now call the cloud. Everything, all of its subscribers information and user files, was stored on servers in the ether world. You didn't have to worry about viruses, malware, trojans, or nothing. No computer firewalls needed on the user end. Nada.

          Another thing WebTV had before everybody else was "The Personal Page" (Page Builder). This predated Black Planet pages, Myspace pages, Facebook pages and all the other come lately pages. I learned how to use HTML by building my own personal page from scratch. I named my page "The Daily Twirl". I had live webcams and everything, including midi music, on that joker. Ah yes, those were the days

          The one thing WebTV administrators did that hurt us webbers was that they agreed to be bought out by Microsoft. From day one their mission was to take what they wanted, patents and things, and remove the tech as a threat. They kept it up and running, for years, but every supposed upgrade they made seemed like a downgrade. When they came out with the X-box people thought they would include WebTV in it, but they didn't. They made it PC friendly and left us out. When they discontinued the News Groups and Message Boards, the writing was on the wall, I, and countless others jettisoned for AOL PC Dial Up, and boards like "Black Voices".

          This has been an Armchair Tech Review Flashback.

          :::K7SP::: :::WebTvMaster!::: and that is where this signature also comes from. lol

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          What's Causing Britain's Food Waste?

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              So in Britain, 10 million tons of food is wasted each year.

              It's reassuring to know that people are starting to question the logic.

              http://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-41973919/what-s-causing-britain-s-food-waste

              While recently in Wales a "zero waste shop" opens..

              http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-...

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              Amish May Hold Anti Aging Protections

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                  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/1711...

                  Date:November 15, 2017 Source:Northwestern University

                  The first genetic mutation that appears to protect against multiple aspects of biological aging in humans has been discovered in an extended family of Old Order Amish living in the vicinity of Berne, Indiana, report scientists. An experimental “longevity” drug that recreates the effect of the mutation is now being tested in human trials to see if it provides protection against some aging-related illnesses.

                  The first genetic mutation that appears to protect against multiple aspects of biological aging in humans has been discovered in an extended family of Old Order Amish living in the vicinity of Berne, Indiana, report Northwestern Medicine scientists.

                  An experimental "longevity" drug that recreates the effect of the mutation is now being tested in human trials to see if it provides protection against some aging-related illnesses.

                  Indiana Amish kindred (immediate family and relatives) with the mutation live more than 10 percent longer and have 10 percent longer telomeres (a protective cap at the end of our chromosomes that is a biological marker of aging) compared to Amish kindred members who don't have the mutation, reports the new Northwestern study.

                  Amish with this mutation also have significantly less diabetes and lower fasting insulin levels. A composite measure that reflects vascular age also is lower -- indicative of retained flexibility in blood vessels in the carriers of the mutation -- than those who don't have the mutation, the research also found.

                  The paper will be published Nov. 15 in the journal Science Advances.

                  These Amish individuals have very low levels of PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor,) a protein that comprises part of a "molecular fingerprint" related to aging or senescence of cells. It was previously known that PAI-1 was related to aging in animals but unclear how it affected aging in humans.

                  "The findings astonished us because of the consistency of the anti-aging benefits across multiple body systems," said Dr. Douglas Vaughan, the lead author of the paper who has been studying PAI-1 for almost 30 years.

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                      "Astrophysicists think we'll be able to detect collisions of supermassive black holes—theoretically each containing as much as billions of times the amount of matter as our sun—within just the next ten years. That's the prediction scientists are making in a new paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy.

                      "This isn't the sort of event we'll be able to hear with the super-sensitive long-distant hearing devices, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) that has so far spotted four examples of black holes merging since February 2016. All of those events have been of much smaller black holes, of more like 30 times the size of our sun.

                      "But the mechanics at play to create gravitational waves during a supermassive black hole merger will work in more or less the same way as these miniature collisions.

                      "Supermassive black holes lurk at the centers of galaxies, and when those galaxies collide, eventually their supermassive black holes will first slowly circle each other spiraling inward like water down a drain, then eventually merge as well. Throughout that dance, their stunningly huge masses warp gravity in their neighborhood, creating gravitational waves rippling out from the collision site.

                      "Those gravitational waves will be at much too deep a pitch for the LIGO detectors and their new European counterpart Virgo to pick up—but scientists should still be able to measure them. That's because these waves should interfere with a very special type of star-like object called a pulsar."

                      https://www.yahoo.com/news/two-supermassive-black-...

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                      Is There (frozen) Life On Mars?

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                          And if they ever did find such microbes on Mars, how compatible would we be with them or vice versa? They could very probably wipe us out in a super pandemic.

                          ___________________________________________________________________

                          'Missions from above and on the surface have been searching for life on Mars for years. But there’s an important question worth asking, amidst this vital search: If life once thrived there, how long could even extreme microorganisms survive in Mars’ current harsh conditions? And where might they best survive? A group of researchers from Lomonosov Moscow State University has just released their answer to those questions.

                          'The paper, published today in the journal Extremophiles, focused on naturally occurring microbes in Arctic permafrost sedimentary rocks, one of the best analogues we have to martian regolith here on Earth. The microbes were exposed to Mars-like conditions such as intense gamma radiation (10,000,000 rads [100 kilograys]), extremely low temperatures and pressures (-58 F [-50 C]; 1 Torr [133 Pascals]), and dehydration. The result? A high number of the microbes survived the harsh simulated climate of Mars, raising hopes that microbes on the Red Planet might also survive within the icy regolith well enough for searching rovers or — someday — human scientists to recover them.

                          The study was conducted using a constant climate chamber and, the authors stress, natural communities of microbes, rather than pure cultures. Studying natural communities allows for a better comparison with reality, allowing for greater biodiversity and increasing the similarities of the studied group to any microbes potentially on Mars. '

                          '“In a nutshell, we have conducted a simulation experiment that well covered the conditions of cryoconservation in Martian regolith,” said Vladimir S. Cheptsov, a post-graduate student at the Lomonosov MSU Faculty of Soil Science, Department of Soil Biology, and an author on the paper, in a press release. “The results of the study indicate the possibility of prolonged cryoconservation of viable microorganisms.”'

                          http://www.astronomy.com/news/2017/11/is-there-fro...

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                          Earthquakes Jolt Icelandic Volcano As It Refills With Magma

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                              'Earthquakes are shaking the ground around Iceland's explosive Bardarbunga volcano, but experts say there's a perfectly reasonable explanation for this: The volcano is likely refilling its tank with magma and preparing, albeit slowly, for its next eruption.

                              '"Bardarbunga is a healthy volcano," said Sara Barsotti, coordinator for volcanic hazards at the Icelandic Meteorological Office. "It is doing what it should be doing."

                              'Bardarbunga is one of Iceland's most active volcano systems. It last erupted from September 2014 to February 2015, spewing lava and releasing gases such as sulfur dioxide.' [Gallery: Iceland's Booming Bardarbunga Volcano]

                              https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/earthqu...

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                              A Huge Plume Of Magma Is Bulging Against Antarctica

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                                  "Imagine drifting over Antarctica's icy expanse. A white continent extends below you, and it's smothered in enough frozen water to drown every coastline in the world in a 216-foot (66 meters) wave if it were to melt. But scientists now believe that, deep beneath almost 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) of ice and a relatively thin slice of rocky crust, one region of the frozen continent hides a column of red-hot magma, straining toward the surface, according to a new study.

                                  "Usually, magma nears the surface only at the edges of tectonic plates. And West Antarctica's Marie Byrd Land, where the plume is suspected to exist, is far from any such border regions. However, there are places in the world where magma reaches toward the surface far from any tectonic border regions, NASA scientists said in a Nov. 7 statement. Yellowstone National Park is one. Hawaii is another. All that magma pushes against the crust in those parts of the world, causing it to bulge and pumping heat up through the ground.

                                  "That heat offered scientists the first clues that the Antarctic plume exists."

                                  https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-huge-...

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                                  Evolution In Action: Lizard Moving From Eggs To Live Birth

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                                      Since we are constantly speaking of higher life forms devolving, I thought it would be nice to see the flip side; evolution.


                                      Evolution has been caught in the act, according to scientists who are decoding how a species of Australian lizard is abandoning egg-laying in favor of live birth.

                                      Along the warm coastal lowlands of New South Wales (map), the yellow-bellied three-toed skink lays eggs to reproduce. But individuals of the same species living in the state's higher, colder mountains are almost all giving birth to live young.

                                      Only two other modern reptiles—another skink species and a European lizard—use both types of reproduction.

                                      Evolutionary records shows that nearly a hundred reptile lineages have independently made the transition from egg-laying to live birth in the past, and today about 20 percent of all living snakes and lizards give birth to live young only.

                                      https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/09/1...

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                                      Scientists Replace Skin Of 'Butterfly Child'

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                                          Skin as fragile as a butterfly's wings -- that's how children with epidermolysis bullosa are described and why they're often called butterfly children.
                                          The disease, of which there are five major types and at least 31 subtypes, is incurable. People with the condition have a defect in the protein-forming genes necessary for skin regeneration.
                                          About 500,000 people worldwide are affected by forms of the disease. More than 40% of patients die before reaching adolescence.
                                          Their skin can blister and erode due to something as simple as bumping into something or even the light friction of clothing, according to an email from Dr. Jouni Uitto, a professor and chairman of the Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College in Philadelphia. Uitto was not involved with this study.


                                          http://www.cnn.com/2017/11/10/health/skin-replacem...

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